Eco-Communalism

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DEFINITION of 'Eco-Communalism'

An economic/environmental philosophy focused upon local economies, sustainability and self-sufficiency. Eco-communalism is centered upon the belief that many self-sufficient local economies connected to one another will be a greater benefit to society as a whole than a centralized capitalistic one. The primary principles of eco-communalism include green economics, biodiversity and decentralization of government.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Eco-Communalism'

Eco-communalists believe that the goodness of society is the key to creating a world that is less reliant on capitalistic traits and more concerned with the common good. In this vain eco-communalism is often closely associated with the ideals of eco-socialism, which is focused on moving towards a more socialist mandate and away from the materialism of modern capitalism.

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