Econometrician

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DEFINITION of 'Econometrician '

A person who uses statistics and mathematics to study, model and predict economic principles and outcomes. Econometricians use statistical measures and mathematical formulas to produce objective results in the study of economics.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Econometrician '

An econometrician is a type of economist who integrates statistics and mathematics into economic analysis. Econometricians use highly specialized math and statistics to generate quantifiable results. Individuals employed as econometricians typically have advanced degrees in statistics and/or economics, although some universities do offer specific degrees in econometrics.

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