Economic Conditions

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DEFINITION of 'Economic Conditions'

The state of the economy in a country or region. Economic conditions change over time in line with the economic and business cycle, as an economy goes through expansion and contraction. Economic conditions are considered to be sound or positive when an economy is expanding, and are considered to be adverse or negative when an economy is contracting. A country's economic conditions are influenced by numerous macroeconomic and microeconomic factors, including monetary and fiscal policy, the state of the global economy, unemployment levels, productivity, exchange rates, inflation and so on.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Economic Conditions'

There are numerous economic indicators that are used to define the state of the economy or economic conditions. Some of these are the unemployment rate, levels of current account and budget surpluses or deficits, GDP growth rates, inflation rates and more. Economic data is released on a regular basis, generally weekly or monthly, and sometimes quarterly. Some economic indicators like the unemployment rate and GDP growth rate are watched closely by market participants, as they help to make an assessment of economic conditions and potential changes in them.

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