Economic Forecasting

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DEFINITION of 'Economic Forecasting'

The process of attempting to predict the future condition of the economy. This involves the use of statistical models utilizing variables sometimes called indicators. Some of the most well-known economic indicators include inflation and interest rates, GDP growth/decline, retail sales and unemployment rates.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Economic Forecasting'

While economic forecasting is not an exact science, it remains an important decision-making tool for businesses and governments as they formulate financial policy and strategy.

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