Economic Shock

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DEFINITION of 'Economic Shock'

An event that produces a significant change within an economy, despite occurring outside of it. Economic shocks are unpredictable and typically impact supply or demand throughout the markets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Economic Shock'

An economic shock may come in a variety of forms. A shock in the supply of staple commodities, such as oil, can cause prices to skyrocket, making it expensive to use for business purposes. The rapid devaluation of a currency would produce a shock for the import/export industry because a nation would have difficulty bringing in foreign products.

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