Economic Think Tank

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DEFINITION of 'Economic Think Tank'

An economic think tank is an organization whose mission it is to study and reflect on economic issues. Economic think tanks are essentially economic policy institutes that work to develop and propose economic strategies and policies to benefit the overall economy. Economic think tanks can be privately funded, and as such can be under scrutiny for being biased towards the needs or special interests of the donor(s).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Economic Think Tank'

Economic think tanks are those intellectual organizations that are focused on economic policies and issues. Although many countries support their own economic think tanks, increased globalization has brought about a new trend in the cooperation between those of different countries.

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