Economic Growth Rate

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DEFINITION of 'Economic Growth Rate'

A measure of economic growth from one period to another in percentage terms. This measure does not adjust for inflation, it is expressed in nominal terms.

In practice, it is a measure of the rate of change that a nation's gross domestic product goes through from one year to another. Gross national product can also be used if a nation's economy is heavily dependent on foreign earnings.

Economic Growth Rate

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Economic Growth Rate'

The economic growth rate provides insight into the general direction and magnitude of growth for the overall economy. In the United States, for example, the long-term economic growth rate is around 2-5%, this lower rate is seen in most highly industrialized countries. Fast-growing economies, on the other hand, see rates as high as 10% although this rate of growth is not likely to be sustainable over the long term.

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