Economic Value Of Equity - EVE

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DEFINITION of 'Economic Value Of Equity - EVE'

A cash flow calculation that takes the present value of all asset cash flows and subtracts the present value of all liability cash flows. This calculation is used by banks for asset/liability management.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Economic Value Of Equity - EVE'

The value of a bank's assets and liabilities are directly linked to interest rates. By calculating its EVE, a bank is able to construct models that show the effect of different interest rate changes on its total capital. This risk analysis is a key tool that allows banks to prepare against constantly changing interest rates.

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