Economic Value Of Equity - EVE

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DEFINITION of 'Economic Value Of Equity - EVE'

A cash flow calculation that takes the present value of all asset cash flows and subtracts the present value of all liability cash flows. This calculation is used by banks for asset/liability management.

BREAKING DOWN 'Economic Value Of Equity - EVE'

The value of a bank's assets and liabilities are directly linked to interest rates. By calculating its EVE, a bank is able to construct models that show the effect of different interest rate changes on its total capital. This risk analysis is a key tool that allows banks to prepare against constantly changing interest rates.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What's the difference between EaR, Value at Risk (VaR), and EVE?

    Earnings at risk (EaR), value at risk (VaR) and economic value of equity (EVE) are measures used to assess potential value ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How often should a small business owner go through a bank reconciliation process?

    Small business owners should go through the bank reconciliation process at least monthly, and many business consultants recommend ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why is a company's Cash Flow from Financing (CFF) important to both investors and ...

    A company's cash flow from financing activities (CFF) is important to investors and creditors because it depicts how much ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between recurring and non-recurring general and administrative ...

    The difference between recurring and nonrecurring general and administrative expenses can best be understood as the difference ... Read Full Answer >>

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