Economist Intelligence Unit - EIU

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DEFINITION of 'Economist Intelligence Unit - EIU'

An organization that provides forecasting and advisory services to assist entrepreneurs, financiers and government officials. The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) provides country, industry and risk analyses based on the work, research and insights of a worldwide network of economic, political and business experts. Additionally, the EIU has a system of country specialists that provide country-specific insight and analysis.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Economist Intelligence Unit - EIU'

The EIU operates as an independent business within The Economist Group. The EIU has provided services since 1946. Free access to certain reports and other information is granted on the EIU website; other reports and data are available for purchase or through paid subscriptions.


The Economist Intelligence Unit offers its clients detailed analyses and forecasts for 187 countries. Clients can access certain data for free or purchase individual articles or complete country access that provides access to a selection of economic, political and business information for a particular country. The service covers a country's economic and political outlook, credit risk, business environment and market opportunities, regulatory environment and financing conditions.

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