Effective Net Worth

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DEFINITION of 'Effective Net Worth'

The shareholders' equity of a corporation, plus subordinated debt. Effective net worth is particularly useful in closely held corporations, since executive officers in these entities are also its owners. Subordinated debt can include debentures or loans to the firm by an owner. Such owners' loans are considered an extension of the company's net worth, provided a subordination agreement is already in place.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Effective Net Worth'

For example, a closely held corporation with total assets of $10 million and total liabilities of $6 million would have a net worth of $4 million. Assume total liabilities include subordinated loans such as debentures and loans from owners of $1 million. Effective net worth in this case would be $5 million.  If you're looking to track your personal net worth, use our free Net Worth Tracker which allows you to calculate, analyze and record your net worth for free.

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