Egalitarianism

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Egalitarianism'

A philosophical thought system that emphasizes equality and equal treatment across gender, religion, economic status and political beliefs. One of the major tenets of egalitarianism is that all people are fundamentally equal. Egalitarianism can be examined from a social perspective that looks at ways to reduce economic inequalities or from a political perspective that looks at ways to ensure the equal treatment and rights of diverse groups of people.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Egalitarianism'

Egalitarianism may focus on income inequality and distribution and, as a philosophy, has influenced the development of various economic and political systems. Karl Marx looked to egalitarianism as a starting point in the creation of his Marxist philosophy, and John Locke considered egalitarianism when he proposed that individuals had natural rights.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Capitalism

    A system of economics based on the private ownership of capital ...
  2. Plutocracy

    A government controlled exclusively by the wealthy either directly ...
  3. Communism

    A political and economic ideology based on communal ownership ...
  4. Socialism

    An economic and political system based on public or collective ...
  5. Marxism

    A social, political and economic philosophy that examines the ...
  6. Income Inequality

    The unequal distribution of household or individual income across ...
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    How Influential Economists Changed Our History

    Find out how these five groundbreaking thinkers laid our financial foundations.
  2. Economics

    Adam Smith: The Father Of Economics

    This free thinker promoted free trade at a time when governments controlled most commercial interests.
  3. Options & Futures

    Nobel Winners Are Economic Prizes

    Before you try to profit from their theories, you should learn about the creators themselves.
  4. Economics

    The Uncertainty Of Economics: Exploring The Dismal Science

    Learning about the study of economics can help you understand why you face contradictions in the market.
  5. Personal Finance

    The History Of Capitalism: From Feudalism To Wall Street

    Find out how the economic system we now use was created.
  6. Trading Strategies

    How can retirees protect their wealth in a bear market?

    Look at some helpful hints about how to protect your retirement nest egg when the stock market is underperforming or the economy is in recession.
  7. Economics

    Can scarcity and surplus coexist together?

    Can surplus and scarcity exist at the same time? Many examples of redistributing wealth and corporate welfare take advantage of this phenomenon.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the affect of the invisible hand on consumers?

    Discover how consumers help initiate and benefit from the invisible hand of the market, which naturally coordinates trade in an exchange economy.
  9. Economics

    How does the invisible hand phenomenon affect investment markets?

    Read about how the invisible hand of the market coordinates investment markets and provides social benefit and why its effects are distorted along the way.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    What are some examples of economies of scale?

    Take a look at different examples of economies of scale, including how marginal costs can be reduced through external and internal factors.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  2. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  3. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  4. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  5. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  6. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
Trading Center