Election Period

DEFINITION of 'Election Period'

The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether or not he or she will exercise his or her option.

BREAKING DOWN 'Election Period'

In this time frame, a person can elect to extend the maturity date on an extendable bond, or retract (shorten) the maturity date on a retractable bond.

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