Electronic Bill Payment & Presentment - EBPP

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DEFINITION of 'Electronic Bill Payment & Presentment - EBPP '

A process used by companies to collect payments via the internet, direct dial access, ATM or other electronic method. Electronic Bill Payment & Presentment (EBPP) is a core component of financial institutions' online bank offerings. There are typically two types of EBPPs: biller-direct and bank-aggregator. Biller-direct refers to electronic billing offered directly by the company providing the good or service. Bank-aggregator refers to paying multiple bills electronically through your bank.




BREAKING DOWN 'Electronic Bill Payment & Presentment - EBPP '

Most large banks will offer these bill payment services and some form of EBPP as a part of their online banking system. Typically you can pay your bills from the comfort of your own home if you have a computer that has a web browser and a connection to the internet.




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