Embedded Value

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DEFINITION of 'Embedded Value'

A common valuation measure used outside North America, particularly in the insurance industry. It is calculated by adding the adjusted net asset value and the present value of future profits of a firm. The present value of future profits considers the potential profits that shareholders will receive in the future, while adjusted net asset value considers the funds belonging to shareholders that have been accumulated in the past.

Embedded Value

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Embedded Value'

Embedded value is a conservative valuation method, as it excludes certain aspects of goodwill from its calculation of a company's worth. Goodwill includes intangible assets that increase the value of a company beyond its assets minus liabilities, such as strong management, good location and a happy workforce. Furthermore, to add to its conservatism, the EV calculation of a firm does not allow for any increase in future business.

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