Emergency Credit

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DEFINITION of 'Emergency Credit'

A loan given by a federal reserve bank to a non-bank institution or organization when no other source of credit is available. The organization in need must examine all other potential sources of funds first. Most of these loans are longer-term, usually more than 30 days.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Emergency Credit'

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (FDICIA) amended the Federal Reserve Act to expand the scope of bailouts for federally-insured depository institutions.

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