Emergency Economic Stabilization Act (EESA) of 2008

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DEFINITION

One of the bailout measures taken by Congress in 2008 to help repair the damage from the subprime mortgage crisis. The act gives the Treasury Secretary the authority to buy up to $700 billion of troubled assets and restore liquidity in financial markets. The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act (EESA) was originally created and proposed by Henry Paulson.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The original form of the EESA was rejected by the House of Representatives in September of 2008 and was therefore revised. A revised version was passed the following month. Proponents of the plan felt that it was vital to minimize the damage done to the economy by the mortgage meltdown, while detractors felt that the cost of the plan was way too high.


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