Emergency Banking Act Of 1933

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Emergency Banking Act Of 1933'

A bill passed during the administration of former U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt in reaction to the financially adverse conditions of the Great Depression. The measure, which called for a four-day mandatory shutdown of U.S. banks for inspections before they could be reopened, sought to re-instill investor confidence and stability in the banking system.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Emergency Banking Act Of 1933'

The infamous stock market crash, which preempted the Great Depression, put great strain on the U.S. monetary system. Collective fears of loss of individual savings as a result of bank failures caused massive runs on the banks, which only compounded the problem. Roosevelt's actions helped restore credibility (and thus functionality) to the banking system and the creation of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation under this legislation helped provide a more permanent solution.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Depression

    A severe and prolonged downturn in economic activity. In economics, ...
  2. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ...

    The U.S. corporation insuring deposits in the U.S. against bank ...
  3. Deposit

    1. A transaction involving a transfer of funds to another party ...
  4. Bank Run

    A situation that occurs when a large number of bank or other ...
  5. Federal Reserve System - FRS

    The central bank of the United States. The Fed, as it is commonly ...
  6. Bank Insurance

    A guarantee by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. I know there is a form of deposit insurance where a portion of my bank account deposits ...

    First things first, it's only partially correct to think that a portion of your bank deposits is protected. The Federal Deposit ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some of the major regulatory agencies responsible for overseeing financial ...

    There are a number of agencies assigned to regulate and oversee financial institutions and financial markets, including the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does neoclassical economics relate to neoliberalism?

    While it may be likely that many neoliberal thinkers endorse the use of (or even emphasize) neoclassical economics, the two ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the main risks to the economy of a country that has implemented a policy ...

    The main risk to the economy of a country that has implemented a policy of austerity is the potential for a self-reinforcing, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the major laws (acts) regulating financial institutions that were created ...

    Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, in conjunction with Congress, signed into law several major legislative responses ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How should a whistleblower report unlawful or unethical behavior?

    Whistleblowing takes many forms. A whistleblower could expose government corruption, expose unethical business behavior or ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Savings

    Are Your Bank Deposits Insured?

    Learn how the FDIC is helping to keep your money in your pockets.
  2. Retirement

    What Was The Glass-Steagall Act?

    Established in 1933 and repealed in 1999, the Glass-Steagall Act had good intentions but mixed results.
  3. Options & Futures

    Bank Failure: Will Your Assets Be Protected?

    The SIPC and FDIC insure against personal financial ruin when banks or brokerages go belly up.
  4. Economics

    What is a Resident Alien?

    A resident alien is a foreigner who is a permanent resident of the country in which he or she resides but does not have citizenship.
  5. Economics

    Explaining Protectionism

    Protectionism is government measures that limit imports into a country to protect commerce within that country against foreign competition.
  6. Entrepreneurship

    Employment Negotiations: What To Ask For & How

    Improving their first offer: What you should know
  7. Insurance

    Why Is Health Care So Expensive In The Us?

    The U.S. is the world leader in only one area of health care: costs. Why is it so hard to rein in these expenses?
  8. Economics

    The Most Likely Outcome For Greece

    After more than five years of a Greek drama, most of us have become fatigued with hearing about Greece’s debt problems, the one issue that won’t go away.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Austerity

    Austerity is an economic term describing government measures to reduce and eliminate budget deficits.
  10. Entrepreneurship

    How To Talk To Headhunters

    8 tips on forging a fruitful relationship with an executive recruiter.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  2. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  3. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  4. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  5. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  6. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!