Emigration

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DEFINITION

The relocation of people from one country to reside in another. People emigrate for many reasons, include increasing one's chance of employment or improving quality of life.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Emigration affects the economies of the countries involved. When people leave a country, they lower the nation's labor force and consumer spending. On the other hand, the countries receiving the emigrants tends to benefit from more available workers, who also contribute to the economy by spending money.


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