An electronically traded futures contract on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange that represents a portion of the normal futures contracts. E-mini contracts are available on a wide range of indexes such as the Nasdaq 100, S&P 500, S&P MidCap 400 and Russell 2000.


For example, the E-mini S&P 500 futures contract is one-fifth the size of the standard S&P 500 futures contract. Advantages to trading E-mini contracts include liquidity, greater affordability for individual investors and around-the-clock trading.

  1. Index Futures

    A futures contract on a stock or financial index. For each index ...
  2. Standard & Poor's 500 Index - S&P ...

    An index of 500 stocks chosen for market size, liquidity and ...
  3. Futures

    A financial contract obligating the buyer to purchase an asset ...
  4. Chicago Mercantile Exchange - CME

    The world's second-largest exchange for futures and options on ...
  5. Index

    A statistical measure of change in an economy or a securities ...
  6. Spoo

    A slang term for an S&P 500 contract that trades on the Chicago ...
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  1. Can mutual funds invest in options and futures?

    Mutual funds invest in not only stocks and fixed-income securities but also options and futures. There exists a separate ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can an investor profit from a fall in the utilities sector?

    The utilities sector exhibits a high degree of stability compared to the broader market. This makes it best-suited for buy-and-hold ... Read Full Answer >>

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