Employee Engagement

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DEFINITION of 'Employee Engagement'

A business management concept that describes the level of enthusiasm and dedication a worker feels toward his/her job. Engaged employee cares their work and about the performance of the company, and feels that their efforts make a difference. An engaged employee is in it for more than a paycheck.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Employee Engagement'

Employee engagement can be critical to a company's success. Engaged employees are more likely to be productive and higher performing. Employers can encourage employee engagement in many ways, including communicating expectations clearly, offering rewards and advancement for excellent work, keeping employees informed about the company's performance, and providing regular feedback.



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