European Monetary System - EMS

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DEFINITION of 'European Monetary System - EMS'

A 1979 arrangement between several European countries which links their currencies in an attempt to stabilize the exchange rate. This system was succeeded by the European Monetary Union (EMU), an institution of the European Union (EU), which established a common currency called the euro.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'European Monetary System - EMS'

The European Monetary System originated in an attempt to stabilize inflation and stop large exchange-rate fluctuations between European countries. Then, in June 1998, the European Central Bank was established and, in January 1999, a unified currency, the euro, was born and came to be used by most EU member countries.

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