Encumbrance

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Encumbrance'

A claim against a property by another party. Encumbrance usually impacts the transferability of the property and can restrict its free use until the encumberance is removed. The most common instances of an encumbrance occurs in real estate such as an outstanding mortgage or unpaid property taxes. However, encumbrance can also be used in an accounting context to refer to restricted funds inside an account that are to be used only for a specific liability.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Encumbrance'

In real estate, if the property has an encumbrance on its title, this will affect the transferability of the title to another party. Encumbrances can also affect property other than real estate such as car titles. With respect to encumbrance accounting, the presence of an encumbrance can give the illusion that there are more available funds inside an account than is actually free for use. In both cases, it is best to understand the details and implications of an encumbrance before engaging in any transaction.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Real Estate

    Land plus anything on it, including buildings and natural resources.
  2. Encroachment

    A situation in real estate where a property owner violates the ...
  3. Silent Automatic Lien

    A lien that does not appear in any public record. This is a method ...
  4. Prior Lien

    A lien that is recorded prior to any other claims. Prior liens ...
  5. Property

    1. Anything over which a person or business has legal title. ...
  6. Unencumbered

    An asset or property that is free and clear of any encumbrances ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Why would you use the TTM (trailing twelve months) rather than the data from the ...

    Public companies report their yearly financial statements along with an annual report. However, financial professionals are ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why is it important for an investor to understand business accounting?

    Investors use financial statements to obtain valuable information used in valuation and credit analysis of companies. Therefore, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the business consequences of using FIFO vs. LIFO accounting methods?

    If a company uses a first-in, first-out accounting method (FIFO), it's likely that its reported earnings will be higher than ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do you analyze inventory on the balance sheet?

    In accounting, inventory represents a company's raw materials, work in progress and finished products. Financial professionals ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What's the difference between regressive and progressive taxes?

    The U.S. federal tax system and local and state tax systems are complex in that they combine progressive, regressive and ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    Attention Home Buyers! Why You Need A Lawyer

    Property transactions are complex and subject to specific state/local rules. A professional can simplify the process.
  2. Options & Futures

    The Foundation Of Structured Settlements

    This annuitized payment setup should be arranged through impartial attorneys and tax agents.
  3. Options & Futures

    20 Investments You Should Know

    To take advantage of all your investing options, you need to know what your choices are. Here we tell you about the diverse features and advantages of 20 different financial instruments.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  5. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  6. Credit & Loans

    Is it Worth Saving Up for a Bigger Down Payment?

    There are numerous low-down-payment mortgage options out there, but sometimes it makes sense to build up your savings so you can borrow less.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Why Last In First Out Is Banned Under IFRS

    We explain why Last-In-First-Out is banned under IFRS
  8. Credit & Loans

    Is A 30-Year Mortgage Really Best?

    It's the most popular choice, but home buyers with 30-year mortgages may be paying more to finance their home than they need to.
  9. Credit & Loans

    What Are The Pros and Cons Of A 15-Year Mortgage?

    The shorter term, and higher monthly payment, are only part of the picture.
  10. Credit & Loans

    Which Is Better: A 30-Year Or 15-Year Mortgage?

    The difference in monthly payments is what homebuyers think of first when they compare the two. But have you considered these other points?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Geometric Mean

    The average of a set of products, the calculation of which is commonly used to determine the performance results of an investment ...
  2. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  3. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  4. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  5. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  6. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
Trading Center