Endorsement

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DEFINITION of 'Endorsement'

1. A legal term that refers to the signing of a document which allows for the legal transfer of a negotiable from one party to another.

2. An attachment to a document that amends or adds to it. Typically, it is an added provision to an insurance policy. Also referred to as a "rider".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Endorsement'

1. When an employer signs a check, they are endorsing the transfer of money from the business accounts to the account of the employee.

2. If an insurance contract has a provision stating that in the event of the policy holder's death the family of the policy holder will continue to receive the policy holder's monthly income for a period of time, this is an example of an endorsement or a rider. Endorsements and riders cause the price of the premium to rise as they provide a positive benefit.

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