Enduring Purpose

DEFINITION of 'Enduring Purpose'

A public statement regarding a company's core principles, defining values, as well as its short- and long-term goals. An enduring purpose is similar to a mission statement and serves to provide a guide as to the company's past and present direction. An enduring purpose can encompass both financial and non-financial goals.

BREAKING DOWN 'Enduring Purpose'

A company's enduring purpose defines the business and attempts to describe its vision and core values. It is considered the guiding principle that all employees are supposed to follow. An enduring purpose can be very important to those wishing to invest in companies that are in sync with their own values. For example, the green movement has even spawned its own index. Recently, Standard & Poor's introduced a new "carbon-efficient index," featuring leading companies in emerging markets that are ecologically conscious.

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