Energy Risk Professional - ERP

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DEFINITION of 'Energy Risk Professional - ERP'

A professional designation awarded by the Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP) to individuals who work in the oil, coal, natural gas and alternative energy industries. People seeking this designation must complete a rigorous self-study program, pass a 180-question, eight-hour exam, have at least two years of qualifying work experience and agree to GARP's professional code of conduct.


Successful applicants earn the right to use the ERP designation with their names, which can improve job opportunities, professional reputation and pay. The ERP program is developed by seasoned energy professionals to teach applicants about real-world scenarios.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Energy Risk Professional - ERP'

The study program to become an ERP covers physical energy markets, financial trading instruments, valuation and structuring of energy transactions, risk management in financial trading, and financial disclosure, accounting and compliance. Individuals with the ERP designation may work for banks, academic institutions, consulting firms, asset-management firms and a wide variety of other organizations concerned with energy risk.

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