Enroned

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DEFINITION of 'Enroned '

A slang term for having been negatively affected by senior management's inappropriate actions or decisions. Being "Enroned" can happen to any stakeholder, such as employees, shareholders or even suppliers. The term is derived from the name Enron, which was an American energy company that filed for bankruptcy in late 2001 due to accounting fraud. These ill actions caused thousands to lose their jobs and investment value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Enroned '

In any large corporation there is faith placed in upper management to make the right decisions and lead the company into profitability. When the company makes decisions that cause job loss or the reduction in benefits, the affected individual is said to have been "Enroned". For example, if someone has lost their job because their employer was shut down due to illegal activities that they had nothing to do with, they have been "Enroned."

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