Environmental Economics

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Environmental Economics '

An area of economics that studies the economic impact of environmental policies. Environment economists perform studies to determine the theoretical or empirical effects of environmental policies on the economy. This field of economics helps users design appropriate environmental policies and analyze the effects and merits of existing or proposed policies.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Environmental Economics '

Environmental economists determine how environmental policies affect the economy. For example, an environmental economist may study the economic costs and benefits of alternative policies for issues such as water quality or managing waste.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Steady State Economy

    An economy structured to balance growth with environmental integrity. ...
  2. Macroeconomics

    The field of economics that studies the behavior of the aggregate ...
  3. Microeconomics

    The branch of economics that analyzes the market behavior of ...
  4. Monopoly

    A situation in which a single company or group owns all or nearly ...
  5. Green Economics

    A methodology of economics that supports the harmonious interaction ...
  6. Green Fund

    A mutual fund or other investment vehicle that will only invest ...
Related Articles
  1. Green Bonds: Fixed Returns To Fix The ...
    Bonds & Fixed Income

    Green Bonds: Fixed Returns To Fix The ...

  2. Can Business Evolve In A Green World?
    Entrepreneurship

    Can Business Evolve In A Green World?

  3. For Companies, Green Is The New Black
    Fundamental Analysis

    For Companies, Green Is The New Black

  4. Five Companies Leading The Green Charge
    Personal Finance

    Five Companies Leading The Green Charge

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Market Segmentation

    A marketing term referring to the aggregating of prospective buyers into groups (segments) that have common needs and will ...
  2. Effective Annual Interest Rate

    An investment's annual rate of interest when compounding occurs more often than once a year. Calculated as the following: ...
  3. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option ...
  4. Odious Debt

    Money borrowed by one country from another country and then misappropriated by national rulers. A nation's debt becomes odious ...
  5. Takeover

    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for an acquiree. If the target company is publicly traded, the ...
  6. Harvest Strategy

    A strategy in which investment in a particular line of business is reduced or eliminated because the revenue brought in by ...
Trading Center