Enterprise Resource Planning - ERP

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DEFINITION of 'Enterprise Resource Planning - ERP'

A process by which a company (often a manufacturer) manages and integrates the important parts of its business. An ERP management information system integrates areas such as planning, purchasing, inventory, sales, marketing, finance, human resources, etc.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Enterprise Resource Planning - ERP'

ERP is most frequently used in the context of software. As the methodology has become more popular, large software applications have been developed to help companies implement ERP in their organization.

Think of ERP as the glue that binds the different computer systems for a large organization. Typically each department would have their own system optimized for that division's particular tasks. With ERP, each department still has their own system, but they can communicate and share information easier with the rest of the company.

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