DEFINITION of 'Escrowed To Maturity'

The condition of a bond that has been repaid in advance by means of an escrow account, which holds the funds needed to pay the periodic coupon payments and the principal.

BREAKING DOWN 'Escrowed To Maturity'

The escrowed funds set aside for a company's debt obligations are usually invested in short-term debt securities - usually low-risk government bills - in order to protect the funds from inflationary depreciation.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Who manages an escrow account?

    Managing an escrow account is a job for a trusted and experienced service provider. Discover the best personal finance solutions ... Read Answer >>
  2. Do landlords set up escrow accounts for their tenants' security deposits?

    Learn when and why landlords place rental property security deposits in separate escrow accounts to make sure the money is ... Read Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between yield to maturity and the coupon rate?

    Read about some of the basic differences between a debt security's coupon rate and its yield to maturity, and learn which ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between a bond's yield rate and its coupon rate?

    Learn why bond coupon payments, which are a series of fixed payments made to a bondholder throughout the life of the bond, ... Read Answer >>
  5. If I buy a $1,000 bond with a coupon of 10% and a maturity in 10 years, will I receive ...

    Simply put: yes, you will. The beauty of a fixed-income security is that the investor can expect to receive a certain amount ... Read Answer >>
  6. How does the money from the interest on my bond get to me?

    When you buy a regular coupon bond, you are entitled to a coupon, which is typically paid at regular intervals, and the face ... Read Answer >>
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