Estimated Current Return

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DEFINITION of 'Estimated Current Return '

The estimated return for a unit investment trust over the short term. The estimated current return is calculated by taking the estimated annual interest income from the securities of the portfolio and dividing by the maximum public offering price, net of the maximum sales charge for the trust.

This measure is less exact than the estimated long-term return and is more susceptible to interest rate risk during the life of the portfolio.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Estimated Current Return '

When looking to invest in a unit investment trust, you will be shown both the estimated long-term return and estimated current return. The estimated current return is where you should look if you are planning to invest for the short term.

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