DEFINITION of 'Euro Interbank Offer Rate - EURIBOR'

The rates offered to prime banks on euro interbank term deposits. The EURIBOR is based on average interest rates established by a panel of around 50 European banks (panel banks) that lend and borrow from each other. Loan maturities vary from a week to a year and their rates are considered among the most important in the European money market.

BREAKING DOWN 'Euro Interbank Offer Rate - EURIBOR'

Currently, there are eight different EURIBOR rates and the banks contributing to EURIBOR must meet stringent qualification rules, including that they be in good market standing. They are selected to ensure that the diversity of the euro money market is fairly represented. As a result, the EURIBOR has consistently been regarded as an accurate guide to what is happening in the euro money market.

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