DEFINITION of 'Eurocheck'

An alternative to the traveler's check, the Eurocheck was issued by a European bank and available in a number of currencies. Eurochecks could be issued in a number of currencies and could be cashed at over 200,000 banks around the world displaying the "European Union" crest. Also known as "Eurocheque."


First introduced in 1969, eurochecks were hugely popular from the 1970s through to the 1990s. They were no longer issued as of January 1, 2002, which led to a precipitous decline in their usage and popularity. Banks decided to stop issuing eurochecks for a number of reasons, including their higher cost of processing, the increasing usage of other forms of payment such as credit cards and ATMs, and the growing incidence of eurocheck fraud.

  1. Account Hold

    Deposits that are delayed before being credited to an account, ...
  2. Eurocurrency

    Currency deposited by national governments or corporations in ...
  3. Eurodollar

    U.S.-dollar denominated deposits at foreign banks or foreign ...
  4. Bank Giro Transfer

    A method of transferring money by instructing a bank to directly ...
  5. Eurobond

    A bond issued in a currency other than the currency of the country ...
  6. Bank Deposits

    Money placed into a banking institution for safekeeping. Bank ...
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