DEFINITION of 'Eurocommercial Paper'

An unsecured, short-term loan issued by a bank or corporation in the international money market, denominated in a currency that differs from the corporation's domestic currency.

BREAKING DOWN 'Eurocommercial Paper'

For example, if a U.S. corporation issues a short-term bond denominated in Canadian dollars to finance its inventory through the international money market, it has issued eurocommercial paper.

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