Euroequity

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DEFINITION of 'Euroequity'

Newly public companies that want to raise more money tend to issue this type of stock. Euroequity is a term used to describe an initial public offer occurring simultaneously in two different countries. The company's shares are listed in various countries rather than where the company is based. This method differs from cross-listing where company shares are listed in the home market and then listed in a different country. Euroequities are sometimes European securities sold on several national markets.


Also referred to as Euroequity Issue.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Euroequity'

This occurs when a company decides to offer stocks during its IPO on more than one country's exchange. Two examples would be British Telecommunications and Gucci. These IPOs were simultaneously offered in the different markets by an international syndicate. A syndicate is an underwriters group that places new issues of a security.

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