Euro LIBOR

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DEFINITION of 'Euro LIBOR'

London Interbank Offer Rate denominated in euros. This is the interest rate that banks offer each other for large short-term loans in euros. The rate is fixed once a day by a small group of large London banks but fluctuates throughout the day. This market makes it easier for banks to maintain liquidity requirements because they are able to quickly borrow from other banks that have surpluses.

BREAKING DOWN 'Euro LIBOR'

The Euro LIBOR is based on the average lending rates of 16 banks. These bank rates are available to the public through the British Bankers' Association. Euro LIBOR exists mainly for continuity purposes in swap contracts dating back to pre-euro times and is not very commonly used.

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RELATED FAQS
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    The best ways to sell an annuity are to locate buyers from insurance agents or companies that specialize in connecting buyers ... Read Full Answer >>
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