Euronext

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DEFINITION of 'Euronext'

A cross-border European stock exchange, originally created in 2000 from the merger of the Amsterdam, Brussels and Paris stock exchanges.

In 2001 and 2002, respectively, Euronext acquired the London International Financial Futures and Options Exchange (LIFFE) and the Portuguese stock exchange, Bolsa de Valores de Lisboa e Porto (BVLP), in order to become one of the world's largest exchanges.

On April 4, 2007, Euronext completed their agreed merger with the NYSE Group, resulting in the formation of NYSE Euronext.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Euronext'

As of 2008, NYSE Euronext manages a variety of exchanges, located in six countries. The company operates the world's most liquid exchange group, with nearly 4,000 listed companies, which represents a total market capitalization of approximately $30.5 trillion.

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