European Bank for Reconstruction and Development - EBRD

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DEFINITION of 'European Bank for Reconstruction and Development - EBRD'

A bank was established in 1991 to aide ex-Soviet and Eastern European countries transitioning into democracies by developing free market economies. Today, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Developement (EBRD) continues its work in 27 countries from central Europe to central Asia, investing mainly in private banks and businesses including both new ventures and existing companies.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'European Bank for Reconstruction and Development - EBRD'

The EBRD is publicly-owned by shareholders in 61 countries and only supports countries committed to democratic principles. The EBRD also helps facilitate the transition of public companies to becoming privately-held entities as well as restructuring state-owned firms and helping to improve municipal services.

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