Enterprise-Value-To-Revenue Multiple - EV/R

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DEFINITION of 'Enterprise-Value-To-Revenue Multiple - EV/R'

A measure of the value of a stock that compares a company's enterprise value to its revenue. EV/R is one of several fundamental indicators that investors use to determine whether a stock is priced well. The EV/R multiple is also often used to determine a company's valuation in the case of a potential acquisition. Other valuation multiples that investors looking at EV/R would likely consider include EV/EBITDA, P/E and P/BV. EV/revenue is most commonly expressed as a number in decimal form followed by an x, as in 2.6x.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Enterprise-Value-To-Revenue Multiple - EV/R'

Investors should compare EV/R for the company being analyzed to that of other public companies in the industry to get an idea of the company's relative financial health. For example, one electronics store's EV/R multiple should be compared to those of other electronics stores, not to those of food manufacturers or healthcare providers. This is true of any type of ratio analysis. Also, investors should always look at a variety of indicators, as no single indicator can provide an accurate picture of a company's performance.



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