DEFINITION of 'Event-Linked Bond'

A type of bond whose interest and principal payments are determined based on the non-occurrence of certain events, such as earthquakes and hurricanes, which are outlined in the prospectus of the bond issue. Event-linked bonds helps insurance and reinsurance companies obtain funding and at the same time mitigate risks against major claims or catastrophe. If an event - usually referred to as a "trigger event" - occurs, then the holder of the bond could see a loss of all future interest payments or a loss of most principal.

Also known as "catastrophe bonds" or "cat bonds".

BREAKING DOWN 'Event-Linked Bond'

The popularity of these bonds is expected to increase as home and asset values climb and the strength and frequency of natural disasters increase. Event-linked bonds came on the scene in the mid-1990s as insurance companies and reinsurance companies found themselves looking for ways to offset risks associated with major events, such as damage caused by a major hurricane. In fact, Hurricane Andrew, which struck Florida in 1992 and caused over $20 billion in related claims, is said to have been a major reason behind the existence of these bonds.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Catastrophe Bond - CAT

    A high-yield debt instrument that is usually insurance linked ...
  2. Catastrophe Reinsurance

    Reinsurance purchased by an insurance company that reduces the ...
  3. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  4. Bond Valuation

    A technique for determining the fair value of a particular bond. ...
  5. Discount Bond

    A bond that is issued for less than its par (or face) value, ...
  6. Bond Option

    An option contract in which the underlying asset is a bond. Other ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Event-Linked Bonds: Competing Against A Catastrophe

    These debt instruments can blow new wind into your portfolio, but only if you can handle the risk.
  2. Investing

    Corporate Bond Basics: Learn to Invest

    Understand the basics of corporate bonds to increase your chances of positive returns.
  3. Investing

    How To Choose The Right Bond For You

    Bond investing is a stable and low-risk way to diversify a portfolio. However, knowing which types of bonds are right for you is not always easy.
  4. Investing

    Investing in Bonds: 5 Mistakes to Avoid in Today's Market

    Investors need to understand the five mistakes involving interest rate risk, credit risk, complex bonds, markups and inflation to avoid in the bond market.
  5. Investing

    The Best Bet for Retirement Income: Bonds or Bond Funds?

    Retirees seeking income from their investments typically look into bonds. Here's a look at the types of bonds, bond funds and their pros and cons.
  6. Investing

    The Basics Of Bonds

    Bonds play an important part in your portfolio as you age; learning about them makes good financial sense.
  7. Investing

    How to Manage Risk With Bonds in Your Portfolio

    Bonds are not immune to risk, so be sure to diversify your portfolio with proper asset allocation.
  8. Investing

    5 Fixed Income Plays After the Fed Rate Increase

    Learn about various ways that you can adjust a fixed income investment portfolio to mitigate the potential negative effect of rising interest rates.
  9. Investing

    Key Strategies To Avoid Negative Bond Returns

    It is difficult to make money in bonds in a rising rate environment, but there are ways to avoid losses.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What determines the price of a bond in the open market?

    Learn more about some of the factors that influence the valuation of bonds on the open market, and why bond prices and yields ... Read Answer >>
  2. What forms of debt security are available for the average investor?

    Discover the various different types of debt securities, issued by government entities or corporations, that are available ... Read Answer >>
  3. Do long-term bonds have a greater interest rate risk than short-term bonds?

    There is a greater probability that interest rates will rise within a longer time period than within a shorter period. One ... Read Answer >>
  4. Can Mutual Funds Only Hold Bonds?

    Find out which mutual funds include only bonds in their portfolios. Learn why some funds invest in different types of bonds ... Read Answer >>
  5. What are the key factors that will cause a bond to trade as a premium bond?

    Learn about the primary factor that can cause bonds to trade at a premium, including how national interest rates affect bond ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Call Option

    An agreement that gives an investor the right (but not the obligation) to buy a stock, bond, commodity, or other instrument ...
  2. Pro-Rata

    Used to describe a proportionate allocation. A method of assigning an amount to a fraction, according to its share of the ...
  3. Private Placement

    The sale of securities to a relatively small number of select investors as a way of raising capital.
  4. AAA

    The highest possible rating assigned to the bonds of an issuer by credit rating agencies. An issuer that is rated AAA has ...
  5. Backward Integration

    A form of vertical integration that involves the purchase of suppliers. Companies will pursue backward integration when it ...
  6. Pari-passu

    A Latin phrase meaning "equal footing" that describes situations where two or more assets, securities, creditors or obligations ...
Trading Center