Excluding Items

DEFINITION of 'Excluding Items'

The common practice of leaving certain factors out of an overall calculation to remove the volatility that might otherwise impact is comparability or distort long-term forecasting. Excluding items can often refer to items left out of the calculation of some earnings per share numbers. Such items may include one-time items, extraordinary expenses or income.

BREAKING DOWN 'Excluding Items'

Excluding items is also common in the calculation of indices. For example, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) is commonly reported excluding two highly-volatile items - food and energy prices - to obtain the so called "core inflation" index.

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