Exclusive Assortment

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DEFINITION of 'Exclusive Assortment'

A merchandising strategy in which a retailer displays the product line of a single manufacturer. An exclusive assortment may be part of an exclusive arrangement between a manufacturer and a retailer, or because the retailer seeks to brand itself as the best location for a particular manufacturer's products. It is less likely because the manufacturer does not allow the sale of its competitors' products by a retailer, as this is often deemed illegal as it is an anti-competitive tactic.

BREAKING DOWN 'Exclusive Assortment'

An exclusive assortment strategy can result in a retailer having both a narrow variety and shallow assortment of products. The depth of assortment is limited because only one manufacturer's products for a particular line are carried, and the variety is potentially narrowed if the manufacturer does not make many different products.

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