Executive Director

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DEFINITION of 'Executive Director'

The senior operating officer or manager of an organization or corporation. Executive director titles (EDs) are frequently reserved for the heads of non-profit organizations, and their duties are similar to a chief executive officer's (CEO) duties of a for-profit company. The executive director is responsible for the day-to-day management of the organization, working with the Board of Directors, and operating within a budget.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Executive Director'

Executive directors of non-profit organizations are usually involved with fundraising efforts, as well as the promotion of the organization in order to raise public awareness and boost membership. The Board of Directors may appoint an executive director, and in some cases the vote must be approved by a specified percentage of the membership. Most executive directors are paid; however, for very small non-profit organizations, the position may be on a volunteer basis.

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