Exemption

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DEFINITION of 'Exemption'

A deduction allowed by law to reduce the amount of income that would otherwise be taxed. An exemption is based on a status or circumstance rather than economic standing.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Exemption'

There are two types of exemptions: personal and dependency.

An example of an exemption is the reduction in taxes you are granted for the dependent children (under the age of 18) living with you.

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