Exhaustion

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Exhaustion'

Situation in which a majority of participants trading in the same asset are either long or short, leaving few investors to take the other side of the transaction when participants wish to close their positions. Exhaustion signals the reversal of the current trend because it illustrates excess levels of supply or demand.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Exhaustion'

Traders can identify periods of exhaustion by looking at the Commitments of Traders Report. This report is published every week and shows levels of open interest in the futures markets. An excessively high number of long contracts could indicate that everybody who wishes to be long has already taken a position, leaving few investors to buy these assets back at a higher price.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Futures Market

    An auction market in which participants buy and sell commodity/future ...
  2. Demand

    An economic principle that describes a consumer's desire and ...
  3. Long (or Long Position)

    1. The buying of a security such as a stock, commodity or currency, ...
  4. Open Interest

    1. The total number of options and/or futures contracts that ...
  5. Reversal

    A change in the direction of a price trend. On a price chart, ...
  6. Supply

    A fundamental economic concept that describes the total amount ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Why is the Time Segmented Volume (TSV) important for traders and analysts?

    Time Segmented Volume (TSV) was designed to track the relationship between a security's trading volume and its price movements. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do traders create strategies based on Chikou Span?

    The Chikou span is the lagging indicator component of the Ichimoku Kinko Hyo candlestick trading model. The Chikou is a line ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the disparity index formula and how is it calculated?

    Steve Nison introduced the disparity index in his book, "Beyond Candlesticks," as a way to analyze price movements in candlestick ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    The Seven-Day Extension Fade

    It's possible to pick a top or bottom with no indicator support. We'll show you how this strategy works.
  2. Options & Futures

    Using Open Interest To Find Bull/Bear Signals

    Volume should inform your use of this indicator in confirming trends and reversals.
  3. Options & Futures

    Intro To Open Interest In The Futures Market

    Applied primarily to the futures market, this indicator confirms trends and reversals.
  4. Forex Education

    Forex: The Moving Average MACD Combo

    Learn a strategy with clear entry and exit levels that will get you into a trend at the right time.
  5. Options & Futures

    Forecast The FX Market With The COT Report

    Three empirical findings on futures data can help currency traders determine buy and sell points.
  6. Charts & Patterns

    Market Reversals And How To Spot Them

    The sushi-roll indicator may help lower the risk of trying to pick market tops and bottoms.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Top 3 ETFs For Investing in Commodities

    Explore diversifying an investment portfolio through investing in commodities ETFs, and get information on some of the best commodity funds.
  8. Investing Basics

    Understanding Total Return Swaps

    A total return swap is a contract in which a payer and receiver exchange the credit risk and market risk of an underlying asset.
  9. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.
  10. Economics

    Why The Dollar’s Strength Can Continue

    Overall, the U.S. dollar has rallied this year, with the Dollar Index (DXY) now up by roughly 8 percent year-to-date, but the gain hasn’t been steady.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dog And Pony Show

    A colloquial term that generally refers to a presentation or seminar to market new products or services to potential buyers.
  2. Topless Meeting

    A meeting in which participants are not allowed to use laptops. A topless meeting organizer can also ban the use of smartphones, ...
  3. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  4. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  5. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  6. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!