Expatriate

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DEFINITION of 'Expatriate'

An individual living in a country other than their country of citizenship, often temporarily and for work reasons. An expatriate can also be an individual who has relinquished citizenship in their home country to become a citizen of another. If your employer sends you from your job in its New York office to work for an extended period in its London office, once you are in London, you would be considered an expatriate or "expat."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Expatriate'

In addition to salary, businesses sometimes give their expatriate employees benefits such as relocation assistance and a housing allowance. Living as an expatriate can be exciting and present a great opportunity for career advancement, but it can also be an emotionally difficult transition that involves separation from friends and family, and adjusting to an unfamiliar culture and work environment. For Americans working abroad as expatriates, complying with United States income tax regulations is an added challenge and financial burden because the U.S. taxes its citizens on income earned abroad.

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