DEFINITION of 'Expedited Funds Availability Act - EFAA'

The Expedited Funds Availability Act (EFAA) was implemented to regulate the hold periods on deposits made to commercial banks. Enacted by U.S. Congress in 1987, the EFAA also standardized financial institutions' use of the deposit holds. The EFAA specifies the types of holds that banks can utilize on a check deposit, depending on the type of account and the amount of the deposit.

BREAKING DOWN 'Expedited Funds Availability Act - EFAA'

The Expedited Funds Availability Act intends to standardize the handling of deposit holds. Banks and other financial institutions must inform customers of their policies regarding deposit holds, as well as any changes to the policies.

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