Export Trading Company - ETC

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DEFINITION of 'Export Trading Company - ETC'

An independent company that provides support services for firms engaged in exporting. This may include warehousing, shipping, insuring and billing on behalf of the client. In addition, export trading companies may help manufacturers find overseas buyers and provide them with other pertinent market information. A group of producers can also form its own ETC.

BREAKING DOWN 'Export Trading Company - ETC'

The Bank Export Services Act of 1982 allowed commercial banks to enter the export trading company arena for the first time and act as owners of ETCs. You can learn more about ETCs through the US Department of Commerce's (USDOC) Office of Export Trading Company Affairs (OETCA) .

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