Ex-Post

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What does 'Ex-Post' mean

Ex-post is another term for actual returns. Ex-post translated from Latin means "after the fact". The use of historical returns has traditionally been the most common way to predict the probability of incurring a loss on any given day. Ex-post is the opposite of ex-ante, which means "before the event".

BREAKING DOWN 'Ex-Post'

Companies may try to obtain ex-post data to forecast future earnings. Another common use for ex-post data is in studies such as value at risk (VaR), a probability study used to estimate the maximum amount of loss a portfolio could incur on any given day.

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