Exposure At Default - EAD

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Exposure At Default - EAD'

A total value that a bank is exposed to at the time of default. Each underlying exposure that a bank has is given an EAD value and is identified within the bank's internal system. Using the internal ratings board (IRB) approach, financial institutions will often use their own risk management default models to calculate their respective EAD systems.

BREAKING DOWN 'Exposure At Default - EAD'

Exposure at default - along with loss given default (LGD) and probability of default (PD) - is used to calculate the credit risk capital of financial institutions. The expected loss that will arise at default is often measured over one year. The calculation of EAD is done by multiplying each credit obligation by an appropriate percentage. Each percentage used coincides with the specifics of each respective credit obligation.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Credit Rating

    An assessment of the credit worthiness of a borrower in general ...
  2. Capital

    1) Financial assets or the financial value of assets, such as ...
  3. Default

    1. The failure to promptly pay interest or principal when due. ...
  4. Default Risk

    The event in which companies or individuals will be unable to ...
  5. Credit Risk

    The risk of loss of principal or loss of a financial reward stemming ...
  6. Cross Default

    A provisions in a bond indenture or loan agreement that puts ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    What Is A Corporate Credit Rating?

    Is the bond you're buying investment grade, or just junk? Find out how to check the score.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  3. Personal Finance

    What Is The Bank For International Settlements?

    Get the scoop on the structure and functions of the oldest global financial institution.
  4. Investing News

    Will Arch Coal file for Bankruptcy?

    In the last four years, Arch Coal Inc. (ACI) has been facing headwinds from lower price of coal amid global oversupply. The shares of ACI have lost nearly 99% of their value this year.
  5. Investing Basics

    3 Companies You Never Thought Would Go Bankrupt

    Understand more about company bankruptcy and why a company would file for bankruptcy. Learn about three companies that went from industry leaders to bankruptcy.
  6. Investing Basics

    These Four Industries Must Change to Survive

    Tech innovations from new companies are threatening long-time industry stalwarts in transportation, hospitality and finance.
  7. Economics

    Oil Companies Near Bankruptcy

    With the resumed uncertainty in Europe surrounding Greece and the sudden bear market gripping China, the price of oil has once again slid under $50. While low oil prices may be welcomed by drivers ...
  8. Economics

    What Does Going Concern Mean?

    Going concern is a concept used in business and accounting to describe the fiscal health of a company.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    Companies That Went Bankrupt From Innovation Lag

    Companies that don't keep up with market-changing innovations run the risk of going bankrupt. We look at some examples.
  10. Investing

    Will Shale Oil Companies Go Bankrupt?

    An overview of shale oil companies and the threats they face in the aftermath of the decline in crude oil prices.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some alternatives a company can attempt prior to resorting to liquidation?

    Some alternatives a company's owners can attempt prior to resorting to liquidation are selling the company, raising money ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Under what circumstances might a company decide to liquidate?

    There are many reasons a company may decide to liquidate. A smaller company may decide to liquidate if one of the main owners ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What happens to the shares of a company that has been liquidated?

    The fate of a liquidating company’s shares depends on the type of liquidation the company is undergoing. The most common ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between compulsory and voluntary liquidation?

    Liquidation is the process where a firm's assets and liabilities are terminated, realized and subsequently distributed. In ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What can cause a merger or acquisition deal to fail?

    When two large companies announce plans to merge, or when the larger of the two acquires the smaller entity, the surviving ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What happens when a corporation declares bankruptcy?

    When a corporation faces severe financial challenges that cause its inability to repay debt obligations, filing for protection ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  2. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  3. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  4. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  5. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  6. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!