Extendable Swap

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DEFINITION of 'Extendable Swap'

An exchange of cash flows between two counterparties, one of whom pays interest at a fixed rate and one of whom pays interest at a floating rate, in which the fixed-rate payer has the right to lengthen the term of the arrangement. The fixed-rate payer might want to exercise its right to extend the swap if interest rates were rising because it would profit from continuing to pay a fixed, below-market rate of interest and receiving an increasing market rate of interest from the floating rate.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Extendable Swap'

The additional feature of an extendable swap makes it more expensive than a plain vanilla interest rate swap. That is, the fixed rate payer will pay a higher fixed interest rate and possibly an extension fee. The opposite of an extendable swap is a cancelable swap, which gives one counterparty the right to terminate the agreement early.

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